Revere Beach Water Testing

For the summer months the water at Revere Beach is tested regularly for health quality.

Please view the following results Beach Water testing.

1). Revere (DCR - DUPR) (View Map | View Lab Data)
Oak Island St. 
Type: Marine
Test Frequency: Weekly
Status:
Open

2). Revere (DCR - DUPR) (View Map | View Lab Data)
Shirley Street 
Type: Marine
Test Frequency: Weekly
Status:
Open

3). Revere (DCR - DUPR) (View Map | View Lab Data)
at state police 
Type: Marine
Test Frequency: Weekly
Status:
Open

4). Revere (DCR - DUPR) (View Map | View Lab Data)
Carey Circle 
Type: Marine
Test Frequency: Weekly
Status:
Open

5). Short (DCR - DUPR) (View Map | View Lab Data)
Sampling Point 
Type: Marine
Test Frequency: Weekly
Status:
Open

Massachusetts Bureau of Environmental Health FAQ on Beach Water Testing

Q: Who monitors the beach water quality?
A: [The Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation conducts beach water testing in Revere.] Most marine beach samples collected at public beaches are analyzed at Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) contracted laboratories, and the cost of analysis is covered by MDPH. Under the beaches acts, MDPH is responsible for ensuring the regulations are adhered to by beach operators and local boards of health and providing technical assistance where needed.

Q: How often is the water tested? 
A: Depending on the beach, the water can be tested anywhere from every day to once per month. The testing frequency depends on how likely the beach is to have water quality issues. Infrequently used beaches or beaches that historically have had very few, if any, water quality issues are tested less often, while high-use or historically problematic beaches are tested more often.

Q: What kind of bacteria is the beach water tested for?
A: The water at marine beaches is tested for the presence of Enterococci. Enterococci are a group of bacterial species within the Streptococcus genus, some of which (e.g. Streptococcus faecalis) are typically found in human and animal intestines and are therefore present in sewage. These tests are also referred to as indicator organisms.

Q: What are the standards for beach water quality in marine water?
A: In marine waters, the accepted level of Enterococci for a single sample is 104 colony forming units per 100 milliliters (cfu/100 ml) of bathing water or below. 

Q: What happens if levels exceed 104 cfu/100 ml?
A: Any sample that comes back with a count greater than 104 cfu/100 ml is called an exceedance. At the vast majority of beaches statewide, if a sample exceeds water quality standards, then posting will not be required if a sample taken the following day shows compliance with water quality standards. For beaches with a history of more frequent elevated bacteria levels that remain for more than 24 hours, postings will continue to be required after each instance of elevated bacteria levels. A “history” is defined as one or more consecutive exceedances in two or more of the last four beach seasons.